Monday, November 14, 2016

Code of Deception

When two OSS agents go missing on American soil, President Roosevelt once again calls upon his trusted aide, Gaston Carson. The search takes Gaston to Santa Fe, New Mexico where he lands in a hotbed of frantic activity surrounding the top secret Manhattan Project and a remote area outside of town. Gaston soon discovers the missing agents are involved in domestic spying outside of the scope of the OSS charter. Santa Fe is the center of international spy activity and Gaston learns he cannot trust anyone, even those he is working with. When President Roosevelt suddenly dies, Gaston is left with no connection to the White House and no one in the Government he can trust. When his wife and child are taken by enemy agents trying to stop the development of the atomic bomb, Gaston must find a way to save his family and prevent the atomic bomb from being sabotaged before a critical test. This is book four of the Code Series featuring Domestic Diplomat, Gaston Carson, during World War II. click hear to view book

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Code Zero

After the United States suffers devastating losses in the Battle of the Coral Sea, it is evident that a new carrier based aircraft is needed, but it is suspected Japan is stealing our aircraft designs before our new fighter planes are even in production. In an intercepted message, Naval Intelligence learns there is one of the latest A6M Zero fighters undergoing tests on the recently occupied Alaskan Island of  Attu, at the extreme tip of the Aleutian Chain.
Gaston Carson, freshly plucked from the senior class at Annapolis by president Roosevelt to serve as his eyes and ears in the states bordering the Pacific is called back the White House for a Top Secret assignment. he must infiltrate the Japanese forces on the island and capture the latest version of the Zero Fighter and deliver it to the United States.
Time is of the essence with American and Canadian forces preparing to launch an attack against the Japanese occupiers.
Facing impossible odds of freezing weather on a remote point over a thousand miles from the mainland, Gaston Carson must find a way to steal the heavily guarded plane, but there is no way the Japan will let the plane go without a fight. Meanwhile those building the latest version of our fighters are waiting to release our latest aircraft. Will the next fighter plane the U.S. launches against the enemy, hold its own against the nimble A6M Zero and its more seasoned pilots?
This is book 3 of the World War II Series.Check out Code Zero on Amazon

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Code of Terror

      Book Two         

It’s September, 1942. The United States is at war in Europe and in the Pacific. The people in the small town of Brookings, Oregon are terrified. Former Naval Academy student, Gaston Carson, has been assigned to serve as Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s personal eyes and ears in the Pacific Northwest, on the job only ten months, and is in the middle of the chaos. Strange balloons are being sighted. Unexplained forest fires are springing up, a school has been bombed and a mysterious airplane, said to be Japanese has been sighted.
Three months earlier Japanese Americans were ordered to inland internment camps. Most went peacefully, but some pledged allegiance to the Imperial Government of Japan. A  Japanese Underground movement has caused the FBI to launch the largest manhunt ever to be conducted in Oregon history.
The stakes are raised when Gaston takes a mysterious phone call and later finds the caller is dead. To make matters worse his girlfriend has been taken hostage. In a frantic period of terror along the Oregon Coast, Gaston risks his life to protect innocent civilians from a ruthless sheriff, a corrupt Civil Defense leader, and a Japanese sympathizer who will kill anyone in his path.
During World War 2 there were many atrocities, among them the treatment of the Jews by the Nazis, the treatment of the Allies taken prisoner by the Japanese and the internment of American citizens of Japanese descent by the Americans.
The internment order was debated at the time and was most certainly unconstitutional. Many Japanese Americans went peacefully into the camps, giving up their homes, businesses and possessions. Some argue that the very act of imprisonment created animosity resulting in home-front terrorists. Code of Terror is a novel set in the Pacific Northwest during the early years of the war, the very time the fear of the people led to the incarceration of our Japanese American citizens. The book is the sequel to Code of Silence and the second book in a three part series.

If you haven’t read book one, Code of Silence, I recommend it as a first read, although Code of Terror can be read as a standalone novel you will get to know the characters better and the setting more personally by starting with book one. This link will take you to the Amazon page for Code of Silence. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B018D12XWA

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

New World War II Thriller CODE OF SILENCE available on Amazon October 7, 2015



I would like to introduce you to CODE OF SILENCE, the first of several novels placed along the Pacific Coast of the United States during World War II.

Life along the Pacific Coastline during World War II is a period of history that little has been written about. At the start of the war, prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, there was wide spread fear that if war broke out with Japan the West Coast of the United States would be at risk of an invasion. The coastline of the Pacific was the least protected area of the United States and the closest to Japan. With little in the way of armament to protect its citizens, the Civil Air Patrol and Civil Defense were established as an early warning system should an invasion occur. The state of Oregon was the most vulnerable for an attack. With no major cities along the coast,and spars populated. The many fishing harbors were ideal for an attack should the enemy desired to do so. But Japan had another plan. She believed she could wage a war of terror, through small scale attacks on our forests and towns, causing panic and an out cry from the citizens of the coastline to be protected. To do this would have moved valuable resources out of the Pacific and given Japan a significant advantage in the war in the Pacific. This is the first book in a series telling the story of the other Pacific War. The war along the Pacific Shores of Oregon Washington and California..

CODE OF SILENCE
Cover Story
Two days after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Japanese submarines are already sinking merchant ships off the Pacific Northwest. The citizens of San Francisco, Seattle and Portland, Oregon are in near panic, afraid an attack on the West Coast of the United States is imminent. To be certain he can trust the intelligence coming to him, Roosevelt needs a man he can trust for a secret mission. He chooses an unlikely candidate, Gaston Carson, a fourth year midshipman at the naval academy in Annapolis. His mission is to give Roosevelt firsthand accounts of enemy activity in the Pacific Northwest. Reluctantly, Gaston abandons his dream of one day commanding a ship, and drops out of the academy, to serve FDR. Gaston soon finds himself in the middle of a war unlike any he had trained for at the academy. Enemy submarines are operating off the coast of Oregon with impunity. We have no defense against them and no way of bringing the fight to them. Reluctant to move troops to protect the coastline, the Navy adopts a plan based on denial and deflection. Tragedies go unreported, news accounts are censored, and murders are covered up. As a civilian, Gaston must find a way to fight the enemy our government claims doesn’t exist. Gaston is in the middle of a war of deceit and deception, and the enemy is both on dry land and at sea. As strange as the concept is, he realizes this is a war that cannot be won without a Code of Silence.
link to my book promotion page    


Friday, September 19, 2014

THE YELLOWSTONE BRIEF

My latest thriller, The Yellowstone Brief is available, free of charge, on Amazon as an Ebook Sept. 20 through Sept. 24, 2014. I'm encouraging as many people as possible to download the book, read it and write a review. Click the link for your free copy  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NPCZU1E
President Ronald Merrill is presented with an impossible challenge shortly after taking over the Oval Office. Yellowstone National Park, a super volcano is going to erupt, and all the president’s advisers, including the nation’s top scientists, say there is nothing he can do about it. Should he tell the world to prepare for disaster, or keep a secret that could threaten every life on the planet? Is the Top Secret document in front of him, The Yellowstone Brief, his only way out?  
Abdul Rahmani, aka Andy Rhane, is a member of The Brothers of Amadon, an Al Qaida affiliated terrorist group. He is not considered a threat here in the United States, that is until he gets his hands on a nuclear warhead, and a copy of a The Yellowstone Brief.  Yellowstone Park Volcanologist Henry Evans tells his boss the recent earthquake activity in Yellowstone is nothing to worry about. Henry has never heard of The Yellowstone Brief. If he had, he would have left the park for a quiet desk job in Hawaii.
USGS Volcanologist Dr. David Wayne is called in from an assignment in Argentina to assist the US Army Corps of Engineers on a secret project in Mexico. Unknowingly he has just walked into the middle of every volcanologist’s nightmare. Everything he is running away from in his personal life is soon going to catch up with him.
Trick Magic can’t wait to escape his isolated job as a geologist on a tiny island in Alaska. On a visit to his lifetime friend and colleague, David Wayne, he realizes he has walked into the middle of a disaster with no way out. with no warning Trick and David are being escorted by the FBI to parts unknown. They will soon have first hand knowledge of The  Yellowstone Brief, and it will be too late to back out.
FBI Agent Heather Martin is bored with her white collar desk job and jumps at the chance when she is recruited to the field. The assignment, track the money trail of a suspected radical environmental organization. Soon she will be far from her Washington D.C. base, fighting for her life in the wilderness of Wyoming. On her way, she learns of The Yellowstone Brief, and is left for dead in Hell’s Half Acre, Wyoming.

Terrorists with a nuclear bomb, the FBI, the U.S. Army, and a team of scientists converge in the caldera of the largest volcano in the Western Hemisphere; how could there not be fireworks? A page turner, beginning to end, this thriller, set in our nation’s first national park, will keep you wondering, is this real or science fiction?
Be sure and get your free copy and please post a review. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NPCZU1E

Saturday, July 12, 2014

WINNING WAYS a short story

“Dallas Hustead,” he said to the officer. “You already know that.”
“Do you understand the charges?”
“Hell, I’ve been gambling all my life. “Of course I know I was cheating’.”
“You’re admitting to it. That’s a new one,” the officer said.
“I’d like to see my attorney,” Dallas said, as he put his hands behind him for the officer to snap on the cuffs.
This was clearly the worst day of his life.
If there was anything Dallas hated worse than loosing at poker, it was loosing to Eddie Elkins. The stupid kid had beat him twice on the World Poker Tour, and robbed him of the coveted gold bracelet, not to mention over four and a half million dollars. The kid was a better player, Dallas had to admit, but that wasn’t what was eating at him. Dallas had written the book on Texas Holdem and it had sold over twenty thousand copies the first week it was on the shelf. He was one of the best. He knew the odds, could calculate the risk in his head, and wasn’t afraid to go “all in” when the cards were in his favor. Luck didn’t enter into the equation. Luck was for suckers. Dallas put a finger to the hearing aid in his right ear to turn down the background noise. There was only one reason the kid had beat him. The kid was cheating.
Dallas began to reflect on the moments before the officer had appeared.
He stared down his opponent with his steel blue eyes, he knew Eddie hated being called the kid. The kid painstakingly worked at making himself look older than his twenty-three years, had grown a mustache and goatee and dressed a little more conservatively for this high stakes match. He knew, he was thrilled to be playing across from him. The kid had read all of his books and would do anything to beat the master at his own game. There was only one problem. When he reached the final table, Eddie had only one third the chips that he had and it was a tremendous disadvantage in heads up play. The kid would have to call in a trump card if he was going to beat the master this time. After all, he was somewhat of a celebrity, a poster boy, if you will, for the younger set who were playing internet poker and watching the big money games on TV. He couldn’t let the master get the best of him at this point in his career. Dallas watched as Eddie glanced over at him giving him a wry smile, a tactic he’d picked up from his book. In fact he’d mastered all the principles Dallas had so eloquently outlined in his book. Eddie lowered the bill of his Raiders cap and straightened the dark glasses to make sure his eyes were not visible. He knew that straightening his glasses was considered a tell. Though it didn’t matter. He had set Dallas up from the time they had started the high stakes game. He could tell by the way Dallas fingered his chips that he didn’t have the hand to back up his massive bet. But he didn’t have to rely on the tell Dallas was giving him. He knew Dallas  only had a pair of deuces. Dallas had told him, by the tell. A million dollars in the pot and Eddie was about to call.
Dallas tipped up the corners of his cards. Stupid, he thought. This pair of deuces isn’t getting any bigger, but it didn‘t have to.  Dallas knew the only way he could lose this hand would be to fold. He had the kid right where he wanted him, holding an ace high with most of his money in the pot. He quickly scanned his opponents stack of chips and determined if he lost this hand it would be all over. There were no more buy ins allowed.
Dallas mucked his pair, knowing full well it was the winning hand.
That was when the security guard descended on him and placed him under arrest.
“You let him win?” the attorney asked, clearly not believing the story.
“Didn’t I just say that,” Dallas said. “There wasn’t any way that runt could have beat me except for what I did.”
“But why?” the attorney asked, still not believing.
Dallas leaned back in his chair, his eyes fixed on the attorney. “I had to. That’s all I’m going to say.”
“I don’t understand it, but  I’ll try to get you out on bail,” the attorney said.
“That will be fine,” Dallas said.
As he walked out of the county jail, he saw his daughter get out of a car. She ran to him. “I want to press charges.”
“It’ll only make matters worse,” Dallas said. “ He doesn’t know it, but the next time he comes up against me, he’s going to get a dose of his own medicine.”
“You’re going to  kidnap his daughter?” she asked.
“No, his new bride,” Dallas said. “The kid has broken all the rules.”

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Vince Lombardi and Lou Holtz were my writing coaches

I remember the late Vince Lombardi, not for his winning seasons with the Green Bay Packers, or for winning the very first two Super Bowl’s, but for his winning spirit and his ability to inspire those on his teams as well as those of us on the side lines. I remember Lou Holtz for his winning years as head coach of Notre Dame in the late Eighties and early Nineties but also for his keen insight into what it takes to win on the field and throughout life. While I didn’t play for either Lombardi or Holtz, the life lessons they taught inspired me, just the same. As I started writing the principals they taught stayed with me. Following are a few quotes from the greats that I apply to to my novel writing.
1. “When all is said and done, more is said than done.” Lou Holtz. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard the phrase, Show, don’t tell. This was a difficult concept for me in my early writing days. When your character is doing something it shows character, strengths and weaknesses. When all is said and done, say little and do a lot.
2. “Never promise more than you can deliver, but always deliver more than you promise.” Lou Holtz. When you start a story at a breakneck pace, the reader is expecting the pace to increase as the story progresses to the climax. To many stories start out like a dragster on a quarter-mile run and end up low on fuel by the end. Give the reader what you promise.
3. Lou Holtz more than once told his Fighting Irish players. “Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do, and attitude determines how well you do it.” Not all have the ability to write great novels, some have the ability, but never do, but if you decide to write, attitude is the  key to how well you do on the next Moby Dick, or Grapes of Wrath.
4. “You are never as good as everyone tells you when you win, and you’re never as bad as they say you are when you lose.” Lou Holtz.  This is so true when you receive a critique on your writing. Not every review you receive is helpful, some are downright painful and some are unwarranted altogether. Treat every review as an opportunity. Honestly assess whether the review was justified. For instance, if someone didn’t like the story because it was poorly researched, poorly edited, or poorly executed, that’s fair criticism. On the other hand, if the complaint is the book is priced outlandishly high and the person wouldn’t buy it until the price was lowered, that’s like saying Picasso wouldn’t go with the furnishings in the room, so don’t buy it. Personally I wouldn’t pay a dollar for a Picasso, but others are willing to shell out millions. What value do you put on a work of art? Art is truly in the eye of the beholder.
4. Vince Lombardi is known for telling his players, “Gentlemen, we will chase perfection and we chase it relentlessly, knowing all the while we will never attain it. But along the way we shall catch excellence.”  No matter how well a book written and edited, there seems to be an error left behind for a reader to discover. This is where an author has it better than a Da Vinci or Picasso. Imagine telling Picasso, “You have an eye out of place,” or “the lips are all wrong.” Even so, as brilliant as Da Vinci was, I doubt he got the Mona Lisa right on the first take. I’ve heard there are many other similar paintings depicting the character in the Mona Lisa, but there is only one that received critical acclaim. We, as authors, can go back and fix what our readers tell us is wrong, up to a point. I take every word left out, or if, and, or but that is out of place seriously, and if the errors are too many, it’s time to get a new editor, and I’ve done that before. After all, I’m paying for a service and I should get the expected value from it. And my objective as an author is to entertain the reader, not make copy critics out of them. The lesson here is to strive for perfection and settle for excellence.
5. A picture is worth a thousand words. Neither Holtz or Lombardi said this, that I know of, and I know it’s an over used cliché, but I needed to throw it in to make a point. The old adage, Don’t judge a book by its cover, just doesn’t cut it in the digital age. I’m beginning to realize the value of a professionally designed book cover, and I am slowly working through my novels, replacing the covers with professional art. The first impression of a book might merit a second glance. Check out the new cover on THREADS OF THE SHROUD, and let me know what you think.

6. “The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.” Vince Lombardi. There is no better place to let a potential reader know what your story is about than in the brief description of the story often found on the inside flap, the back cover or in the book description. This is where your target audience is captured. If the description doesn’t leave some compelling questions to be answered it probably won’t entice the reader to go to the next step and read the first few pages of the book. It seems no matter how many times a description can be written, one more time makes it better. Work hard on the description.
7.  “The measure of who we are is what we do with what we have.” Vince Lombardi. The first three pages of any story are critical. I remember my mystery writing instructor saying, “If there is a rifle hanging over the fireplace in the first scene, it better have been used to shoot someone before the end of the chapter.” The story needs to build from the start. How a story measures up is dependent on what it is given in the start.
8. “Gentlemen, this is a football.” Vince Lombardi is said to have told his players. I’m sure everyone in the locker room knew what a football was, but Lombardi was illustrating a point that we sometimes forget. When things aren’t going right we may have to start over. A well written book is like a winning football team. The readers are the fans and also our critics. They tell us the value of our work. When a book isn’t winning, we need to know why.  Perhaps it’s time to start over.
Finally Vince Lombardi, left us with this. “The quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor.”